Projects/Activities

The full list of projects contains the entire database hosted on this portal, across the available directories. The projects and activities (across all directories/catalogs) are also available by country of origin, by geographical region, or by directory.

Displaying: 81 - 100 of 228 Next
81. NWS Arctic activities

More information about NWS observing activities will be available in due course Alaska Region Headquarters, http://www.arh.noaa.gov/ Weather station list and real-time observations, http://www.arh.noaa.gov/obs.php Marine observations, http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/maps/Alaska.shtml Hydrology – Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center, http://aprfc.arh.noaa.gov/

Climate Atmosphere
82. Russian-American Long-term Census of the Arctic (RUSALCA) (RUSALCA)

Observe changes in the ecosystem, fluxes of heat, salt, nutrients, CO2, and methane from the seafloor to the atmosphere above, as a function of changing climate in the Pacific Arctic region from the Bering Strait north to the high Arctic. Main gaps: So far unable to go far into the ice for investigation, although the geographical scope of the RUSALCA mission increased in 2009 because of the reduction of sea ice cover. (we were able to reach a northernmost site and to sample as far north as 77°30’N.

Oceanography Atmosphere Ecosystems
83. National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) (NDBC)

To provide real-time marine meteorological, oceanographic and geophysical observations in real-time to the World Meteorological Organization’s Global Telecommunications Service (GTS).

Oceanography Atmosphere Ecosystems
84. Ecosystems and Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations (EcoFOCI) (EcoFOCI)

The Bering Sea is an extremely rich ecosystem providing almost half of the US catch of fish and shellfish. EcoFOCI has four moorings (M2, M4, M5 and M8), which are an important component in the observational system, monitoring changes in the ecosystem. Data are used by ecosystem managers, modellers (model validation), and scientists. They provide critical information on the spatial temperature structure, timing of phytoplankton blooms, cold pool and presence of marine mammals. Main gaps: Expanding instrumentation to measure ice thickness, nutrients, oxygen, PAR, zooplankton biovolume and atmospheric variables to all four of the mooring sites. Increase vertical resolution of nutrients. Expand measurements northward into the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas.

Oceanography Atmosphere Human health Ecosystems
85. NOAA Arctic Atmospheric Observatories

More information about the following long-term observing activities will be available in due course

Climate Atmosphere
86. Atmospheric Baseline Observatories – Barrow, Alaska

More information about the following long-term observing activities will be available in due course

Climate Atmosphere
87. Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS)

To develop a coastal and ocean observing system in the Alaska region that meets the needs of multiple stakeholders by (1) serving as a regional data center providing data integration and coordination; (2) identifying stakeholder and user priorities for ocean and coastal information; (4) working with federal, state and academic partners to fill those gaps, including by AOOS where appropriate. Main gaps: AOOS and the data center are statewide activities, but thus far, available funding has limited observations and models primarily the Gulf of Alaska.

Climate Oceanography Atmosphere Human health Ecosystems
88. Automated Surface Observing System - Alaska (ASOS)

More information about the following aviation meteorology observing activities will be available in due course

Climate Atmosphere
89. Beaufort and Chukchi Seas Mesoscale Meteorology Model

1. Produce a geospatial surface meteorological database for the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas and the adjacent coastal areas by collecting available conventional and unconventional surface and atmospheric data and conducting field work; 2. Establish a well-tuned Beaufort/Chukchi seas mesoscale meteorology model through further modeling studies for the optimization and improvement of the model physics and configuration; 3. Conduct a long-term hindcast simulation with the optimized data-modeling system and produce a high resolution meteorological dataset for the Beaufort and Chukchi regions; and 4. Document the high-resolution climatological features of the Beaufort/Chukchi seas’ surface winds, including an analysis of the interannual variability and long-term

Atmosphere
90. NPS Inventory and Monitoring Program, Alaska Region

To determine status and trend in the condition of selected natural resources in national park units in Alaska. There are four networks, each encompassing activities in a set of national parks, preserves and other park lands: • Arctic Network (ARCN): Gates of the Arctic, Noatak, Kobuk Valley, Cape Krusenstern, Bering Land Bridge. • Central Alaska Network (CAKN): Yukon-Charley Rivers, Denali, Wrangell-St. Elias. • Southwest Alaska Network (SWAN): Kenai Fjords, Lake Clark, Katmai, Alagnak Wild River, Aniakchak. • Southeast Alaska Network (SEAN): Glacier Bay, Klondike Gold Rush, Sitka. Main gaps: Not all data are currently available but we are working toward that goal. Funding limitations do not allow monitoring at detailed levels.

Atmosphere Ecosystems
91. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) (ACRF)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) is a multi-platform national scientific user facility, with instruments at fixed and varying locations around the globe for obtaining continuous field measurements of climate data. Each ACRF site uses a leading edge array of cloud- and aerosol-observing instruments to record long-term continuous atmospheric and surface properties that affect cloud formation and radiation transport through the atmosphere. The ARCF also provides shorter-term (months rather than years) measurements with its two mobile facilities (AMFs) and its aerial measurements. Network type: - Atmosphere, with a focus on the impact of clouds and aerosol on the Earth’s radiation budget. - Location: Primary site: Barrow, Alaska, 71° 19' 23.73" N, 156° 36' 56.70" W Secondary site: Atqasuk, Alaska, 70° 28' 19.11" N, 157° 24' 28.99" W - Community-based: No.

Climate Atmosphere
92. Denmark Satellite observations as base for atmosphere related ECV observations

Upper-air temperature Homogenized upper-air temperature analyses: extended MSU-equivalent temperature record, new record for upper-troposphere and lower-stratosphere temperature using data from radio occultation, temperature analyses obtained from reanalyses. Water vapour Total column water vapour over the ocean and over land, tropospheric and lower stratospheric profiles of water vapour. Ozone Profiles and total column of ozone.

Climate Sea ice Oceanography Atmosphere
93. Denmark upper air strata measurements radio sounding observations

DMI runs radio sounding stations at the following six locations: Tórshavn (the Faroe Islands), Danmarkshavn, Illoqqortoormiit, Tasiilaq, Narsarsuaq and Aasiaat (Greenland). Two soundings are made every day at these stations. A monthly summary (CLIMAT TEMP) from all stations is prepared and transmitted routinely on the GTS.

Climate Atmosphere
94. Greenland Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and stratospheric ozone stations

Solar Ultraviolet (UV) radiation at different wavelengths is measured by DMI at two stations in Greenland, namely Pittuffik and Kangerlussuaq. In addition, DMI performs weekly ozone soundings at Illoqqortoormiut as well as sporadic ozone soundings at Pituffik during the winter months.

Climate Atmosphere
95. Denmark Climatological/meteorological surface stations

DMI operates and receives data from a network of approximately 100 automatic meteorological stations in Denmark, Greenland and on the Faroe Islands. Measurements are made in accordance with the WMO recommendations. As of 2001 a special dedicated network of (manual) stations for climatological observations has been discontinued, due to the convergence between the different network technologies. The objectives behind this decision are to eliminate human errors, to benefit from potential savings due to this rationalisation, and to reach a higher observation frequency. Climatological data are now obtained from the automatic network described above. Climatological data are collected to define the climate in Denmark, Greenland and on the Faroe Islands and to create a national database for a wide range of enquiries and research activities. Climatological work mostly consists of preparing annual and monthly statistics, including calculation of averages, percentiles and standard deviations. Substantial recorded data are needed to establish reliable averages and trends. In 2008 the daily inflow of data from Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands was 100,000 observations, and the central database at DMI currently contains more than 300,000,000 observations. Some of the recorded data are from as early as 1872. A monthly summary is prepared for the three stations in Denmark, one on the Faroe Islands and eight in Greenland using the CLIMAT format. These data are routinely submitted via the GTS. Radiation is measured as 10- minute mean values of global radiation at the DMI operated weather station.

Climate Atmosphere
96. Denmark Contributions to the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW)

As part of the GAW programme, Denmark contributes to the Global Ozone Observing System (GO3OS) with three stations in Greenland and one in Denmark. The stations in Greenland are: Kangerlussuaq, Pituffik and Illoqqortoormiut The station in Denmark is located in Copenhagen The stations in Greenland are primary and secondary stations in the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC) that is supported by the International Ozone Commission.

Climate Atmosphere
97. Denmark contributions to the GCOS Upper Air Network (GUAN)

Only one GUAN station is designated for Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands and it is situated in Narsarsuaq (WMO nr. 6186), Greenland. The station is run by DMI and is operated in accordance with the required standard.

Climate Atmosphere
98. Denmark GCOS Surface Network (GSN)

The seven designated GSN stations in Denmark, Greenland and on the Faroe Islands are all run by DMI and include (Numbers are WMO station numbers): Greenland: 4211 Upernarvik, 4250 Nuuk, 4320 Danmarkshavn, 4360 Tasiilaq, 4390 Prins Christian Sund; The Faroe Islands; 6011 Tórshavn Denmark: 6186 Copenhagen. All of these stations currently meet the required standard for surface observation.

Climate Atmosphere
99. Wind resource measurements in Greenland

Wind resources measurements near several settlements to determine whether wind energy can be used as a local energy source and replace fossil fuel. The project concentrates on settlements in Sisimiut and Uummannaq and includes 6 settlements. A standard measurement setup consisting of a 10 m NRG-Systems meteorological mast equipped with a cup anemometer, a wind vane and a thermometer has been installed at each location. A 6 kW demonstration wind turbine has recently been erected in Sarfannguaq to document the potential of merging wind energy with a diesel powered electricity system. Network type: Wind resources

Climate Atmosphere
100. Atmospheric Observations

To acquire atmospheric data in support of both the prediction and detection of severe weather and of climate trend and variability research. This serves a broad range of users including researchers, policy makers, and service providers. Main gaps: Long-term, atmospheric monitoring in the North poses a significant challenge both operationally (e.g. in-situ automated snowfall measurements) and financially (charterd flights for maintenance and calibration).Most monitoring in the North is limited to populated areas. Attempts to develop an AMDAR capacity out of First Air and Canadian North fleets failed due to economical and technical difficulties. As demonstrated through impact studies, benefits of AMDAR in the North would be tremendous, however would require acquisition and deployment of specialized sensing packages such as TAMDAR (which includes measurements of relative humidity), development of datalink capacity through satellite communications (e.g. Iridium), and upgrading some aircraft systems when possible, especially the aircraft navigation systems. Network type: Atmospheric observing stations over land and sea composed of: - Surface Weather and Climate Network: o In-situ land stations comprising both Hourly stations and Daily Climate observations - Marine Networks: o Buoys (moored and drifting) o Ships: Automatic Volunteer Observing System - Upper Air Network: o In situ (radiosonde) o In situ Commercial Aircraft (AMDAR)

Oceanography Atmosphere Human health